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Double-Play Runs - DPR

What is Double-Play Runs - DPR?

A metric that examines the positive and negative effects of an infielder's ability (or inability) to turn double plays. The resulting value is an indication of how many runs a certain infielder has gained or lost for his team compared to what an "average" infielder would do in the same situations.

 

Sporting Charts explains Double-Play Runs - DPR

In calculating DPR, several things are taken into account. How hard the ball was hit, the location of the ball when caught by the initial infielder, and the speed of the runner to first base are all factored into DPR. The average outcome in these situations is then subtracted from the actual outcome of a particular infielder, yielding a positive or negative DPR value. All the possible scenarios are analyzed to determine their run value, so the final DPR number is a net gain/loss of team runs.

For example, let's say there is a runner at first base, and the batter hits a groundball to the "hole" between second and third base. The shortstop makes a great grab and quickly throws to second, and in turn the second baseman makes a strong throw to first to complete the double play. In most instances, a play like this is going to end up being a fielder's choice out at second base only. Therefore, the players who turned this double play will earn a positive DPR since "average" fielders would not have been able to turn this double play.

In clculating DPR, several things are taken into account. How hard the ball was hit, the location of the ball when caught by the initial infielder, and the speed of the runner to first base are all factored into DPR. The average outcome in these situations is then subtracted from the actual outcome of a particular infielder, yielding a positive or negative DPR value. All the possible scenarios are analyzed to determine their run value, so the final DPR number is a net gain/loss of team runs.

For example, let's say there is a runner at first base, and the batter hits a groundball to the "hole" between second and third base. The shortstop makes a great grab and quickly throws to second, and in turn the second baseman makes a strong throw to first to complete the double play. In most instances, a play like this is going to end up being a fielder's choice out at second base only. Therefore, the players who turned this double play will earn a positive DPR since "average" fielders would not have been able to turn this double play.

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